Beata Science Art

My most recent artistic adventures:
  1. Growing Brain Cancer in Petri Dishes
    30 Jul, 2018
    Growing Brain Cancer in Petri Dishes
    Brain tumors are aggressive and deadly cancers, yet it has been difficult to study them in the laboratory. A new Nature Methods paper reports a ground-breaking method to grow tumors inside brain organoids, which are tiny organ-like structures derived from human stem cells that resemble the architecture of the brain. These tumors develop after introducing clinically-relevant mutations using genome-editing, and mimic the onset of brain cancer within the human brain - allowing researchers to learn
  2. An Epigenetic Jungle
    23 Jul, 2018
    An Epigenetic Jungle
    A gibbon is swinging across a river within an epigenetic landscape, which regulates compaction and expression of our DNA. The arid desert illustrates loosely packed DNA containing actively expressed genes, whereas the tropical forest represents densely packed chromatin. The gibbon genome is similar to ours, but many regions were heavily rearranged during evolution. Still, even the rearranged genes keep their original epigenetic landscapes because the shuffling has occurred at boundaries between
  3. A Knitted Network of DNA
    24 Aug, 2017
    A Knitted Network of DNA
    During division, cells disassemble their nucleus and release many independent chromosomes - but how are all those chromosomes enclosed in a single nucleus after mitosis? The protein BAF cross-bridges DNA strands, allowing the cell to 'knit' a network of DNA around the chromosome ensemble and guide the nuclear membrane along the surface. This drawing illustrates BAF as beads that link the DNA strands into a network. Congratulations to the Gerlich lab on this fantastic Cell paper!
  4. A Dynamic ESCRT for Splitting Membranes
    06 Aug, 2017
    A Dynamic ESCRT for Splitting Membranes
    I'm so excited to share a drawing I made for my own paper recently published in Nature Cell Biology!  This artwork illustrates the dynamics of a protein machinery for splitting membranes. This machinery, called ESCRT-III, forms spirals that constantly exchange their building blocks with the help of a protein called VPS4. This remodeling allows the spirals to change their shape and constrict membranes until they split, for example in the final step of cell division that separates the emerging
  5. Nature Methods Cover - An Arrow Poison for CRISPR
    31 May, 2017
    Nature Methods Cover - An Arrow Poison for CRISPR
    My new artwork on the current Nature Methods cover - what a great honor! Ouabain, a molecule traditionally used as an arrow poison in Africa, is used as a new selection method for CRISPR. Congratulations to the Doyon lab for a fantastic paper!
  6. EMBO Journal Cover - Self Organization in Cerebral Organoi
    15 May, 2017
    EMBO Journal Cover - Self Organization in Cerebral Organoids
    So excited have my drawing on the current issue of EMBO Journal! This artwork illustrates how 'minibrains' self-organize their cells into distinct zones - like a yin-yang symbolizing the balance between distinct but complementary entities.
  7. CSHL Symposium on Chromosome Segregation & Structure
    01 Mar, 2017
    An Eye-catcher for the CSHL Symposium
    I had the huge honor to illustrate the poster for the 82nd Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Symposium on Chromosome Segregation and Structure.
  8. The 'ESCRT' dress
    28 Jan, 2017
    An 'ESCRT' Dress to Address My Research
    I made this dress to explain my research on cytokinetic abscission - the final step of cell division.