Mission Patch for Worms in Space

Beata Edyta Mierzwa

Saturday, September 29, 2018

Beata Science Art

  1. Self-RNA editing is required for self tolerance
    06 Dec, 2018
    EMBO Reports Cover
    My new cover for EMBO Reports - illustrating how editing of RNAs prevents autoimmunity! Our immune system is extremely efficient in protecting us from foreign pathogens, yet at the same time requires self tolerance. A new paper shows that the protein ADAR1 is required for editing the sequence of RNAs to prevent them from being recognized as foreign by the immune system. When this process is perturbed, unedited RNAs inhibit the elimination of T cells that recognize self antigens, leading to
  2. A Scientific Star Map
    26 Aug, 2018
    A Scientific Star Map
    It's a wonderful honor to present my new drawing for this year's ASCB|EMBO meeting! The intricate patterns of our night sky have inspired many ancient cultures who connected the stars to create constellations portraying myths and legends. This 'modern' star map is a scientific take on zodiac signs - showing constellations that form some of the most widely used model organisms and cell types. These model systems have greatly facilitated research and allowed us to discover much of what is known
  3. Growing Brain Cancer in Petri Dishes
    30 Jul, 2018
    Growing Brain Cancer in Petri Dishes
    Brain tumors are aggressive and deadly cancers, yet it has been difficult to study them in the laboratory. A new Nature Methods paper reports a ground-breaking method to grow tumors inside brain organoids, which are tiny organ-like structures derived from human stem cells that resemble the architecture of the brain. These tumors develop after introducing clinically-relevant mutations using genome-editing, and mimic the onset of brain cancer within the human brain - allowing researchers to learn
  4. An Epigenetic Jungle
    23 Jul, 2018
    An Epigenetic Jungle
    A gibbon is swinging across a river within an epigenetic landscape, which regulates compaction and expression of our DNA. The arid desert illustrates loosely packed DNA containing actively expressed genes, whereas the tropical forest represents densely packed chromatin. The gibbon genome is similar to ours, but many regions were heavily rearranged during evolution. Still, even the rearranged genes keep their original epigenetic landscapes because the shuffling has occurred at boundaries between
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